Dry Needling Offered at Kauai Therapy & Wellness: Ponderay, Idaho

Idaho joins more than 40 other states in allowing patients access to dry needling provided by Physical Therapists.

History of Dry Needling

Dry Needling’s history dates back to the 1940’s as a result of research into lidocaine and corticosteroid injections from Dr. Janet Travell & Dr. David Simons. They discovered through their research that the “needle effect” is distinct from that of the injected substance (“wet” needling). It is important to recognize that the origins of Dry Needling are drawn from Western Medicine principles and scientific, research-based conclusions. 

Fast forward to 2021, and modern dry needling (DN) is currently being written. Medical and allied health professionals are incorporating DN with their current modalites, techniques and treatment concepts.  Today’s modern DN is part of a multi-modal treatment plan, not a stand alone modality.  Practitioners continue to find new ways to integrate and expand the use of DN to improve clinical results at a pace not previously achieved. The future of DN is exciting and filled with the potential to help more patients manage an expanding list of conditions. 

What is it? How does it work?

Dry needling is a treatment technique that uses a thin, solid, and thread-like needle to target specific areas of soft tissue. The needle stimulates the body to respond by increasing circulation, normalizing inflammation, and decreasing tissue tension. The DN works to provide pain relief, and replace injured tissue with new tissue, all with the goal of promoting self-healing in areas of acute or chronic injuries. Only sterile, single use, disposable needles are used for the treatment. Needles can be inserted in different areas of the body, including trigger points (hyperirritable contracted bands within a muscle that can cause local or referred pain), local/symptomatic soft tissues, paravertebral points along the spine, and along peripheral nerve pathways. The needle is not medicated, and the method is not a form of acupuncture. 

Dry needling is part of Western medicine and can be performed by a Physical Therapist who is licensed with the state. State laws govern the practice of Dry Needling. Dry Needling has established itself as a treatment that is minimally invasive, cost effective and carries a low risk.

What can it help and when is it not appropriate?

Dry needling is commonly associated with the following conditions:

  • Inflammation
  • Muscle tension and spasms
  • Ligament strains
  • Tendon injuries
  • Trigger points
  • Scar Tissue
  • Fascial Adhesions
  • Nerve Irritation
  • Low back pain
  • Sports Injuries
  • Headaches
  • Sciatica

Dry needling is not appropriate for people who have:

  • Phobia of needles
  • Cognitive impairment
  • Local skin lesion
  • Local or systemic infection
  • Uncontrolled bleeding or anticoagulant therapy
  • Compromised immune system
  • Vascular disease/varicose veins
  • Recent surgical procedure where the joint capsule has been opened
  • Women in their first trimester of pregnancy.

What happens after dry needling treatment?

Some people feel pain relief immediately, while some take several sessions to notice a change in their symptoms. Others may feel achy immediately after the needling, with symptom relief later that evening or the next day. Rarely does the needling treatment cause an increase in symptoms. Although uncommon, some negative reactions associated with needling can include bruising, bleeding, feeling faint or dizzy, sweating, or itching/burning. Approximately 80% of the time, patients have found the procedure to be pain-free.

If you’re experiencing the pain and decreased range of motion from trigger points or other related conditions, dry needling from a licensed physical therapist can bring you much-needed relief. Our Idaho location is offering Dry Needling by our certified Dr. Garrett Fischer, DPT Cert. DN.

Dry Needling as an Opioid Alternative?

With the high number of opioid-addicted patients in Idaho, many are searching for alternative methods for pain management. Dry needling, is one method that has healthcare providers hopeful. According to the CDC latest data,  In 2017, Idaho providers wrote 70.3 opioid prescriptions for every 100 persons. This is higher than the national average of 58.7 opioid prescriptions. At Kauai Therapy & Wellness a lot of people feel immediate relief within the first session, and most get this treatment twice a week for a few weeks. What some are saying about their experience with Dry Needling:

“I have been plagued with pain in my foot & knee for the past five years. No one has been able to help me like Kauai Therapy & Wellness. Unbelievable! I have only had a few treatments involving dry needling & already I am starting to be able to climb the stairs again!“ Lori (Peaches) from Sandpoint, Idaho.

Your physical therapist should be appropriately trained and certified in providing dry needling techniques, and will display the (Cert. DN.) credentials to indicate this level of training. The therapists will choose the appropriate size and thickness needle for treating your condition based on your body size and muscle tissue thickness. While Dry Needling is an effective treatment for musculoskeletal pain, it does pose potential side-effects. While these side-effects are normal and/or rare in occurrence, they must be considered prior to giving consent to treatment. Dry Needling is covered by medical insurance.

Garrett Fischer, DPT of Kauai Therapy & Wellness (Ponderay Location) currently holds certifications in dry needling (Cert. DN.) from the Dry Needling Institute. Call: 208-205-9559 to Schedule with Dr. Fischer.